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Edward E. Andrews

Associate Professor

Contact Information:

eandrews@providence.edu

401.865.1594

Ruane Center for the Humanities 122

Education:

Ph.D. - The University of New Hampshire

Area(s) of Expertise:

Dr. Edward E. Andrews is Chair of the Department of History and Classics, and a recent recipient of The Joseph R. Accinno Teaching Award for outstanding teacher at Providence College. A historian of early America, with an emphasis on cultural interactions in the British Atlantic World, his research has focused on African, African American, and Indian missionaries, as well as wider evangelical networks in the Atlantic and beyond. Dr. Andrews published his first book, Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic World, with Harvard University Press in 2013. His work has also appeared in The William and Mary Quarterly, Oxford Bibliographies in Atlantic History, The Journal of Church and State, The Radical History Review, and Common-Place, among others. His current project is a dual biography of two Newports: the first being Newport Gardner, an African slave turned community leader, and the second being Newport, Rhode Island and its tumultuous relationship with slavery.

Selected Publications:

Andrews, E. (2017) "Tranquebar: Charting the Protestant International in the British Atlantic and Beyond". The William and Mary Quarterly.(74), 3-34.

Andrews, E. (2013) In Jeffrey A. Fortin and Mark Meuwese (Ed.), "The Crossings of Occramar Marycoo, or Newport Gardner". Leiden: Brill

Andrews, E. (2013) Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic World. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press

Andrews, E. (2009) "Christian Missions and Colonial Empires Reconsidered: A Black Evangelist in West Africa, 1766-1816". The Journal of Church and State.(51), 663-691.

Andrews, E. (2007) "Creatures of Mimic and Imitation: Black Elections, The Liberty Tree, and the Politicization of African Religious Space in Revolutionary Newport, Rhode Island". The Radical History Review.(99), 121-139.

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